Category Archives: Forest education

How timber harvesting areas determined

Paul Schuetz outlines in  How are timber harvesting areas determined the steps BC operations foresters must take before an area is approved to harvest.  Non-foresters are provided with independent and knowledgeable information about forest planning. Paul is VP and General Manager of Forestry Operations at Industrial Forestry Service Ltd.  For the past 27 years Paul has managed large-scale forestry projects for both industry and government clients throughout Western Canada. The article was previously posted in the Truck Logger BC-Winter 2022 edition.

How do trees talk to one another?

Dr. Suzanne Simard in the TED talk https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=4&v=Un2yBgIAxYs  provides an excellent description of the research work she and her colleagues have done regarding how trees exchange nutrients and awareness of up coming disease attacks through their roots.

Scientific research is intended to inform forest management policy and practices.  Foresters are confronted with many challenges planning and implementing actions to achieve long-term forest stewardship.  The process involves balancing environmental, economic, social and cultural values.  The challenge in the case of the research provided by Dr. Simard should be how to include this knowledge as a serious part of the input into the forester’s decision-making but not necessarily the only component in the decision.

Nova Scotia industry responding to pulp mill closure

The NS forest sector has “…been planning the change for several months” prior to the announcement of the closure of their pulp mill https://tinyurl.com/ybjxamle The plan is for actions innovative to the normal Sector way of operating. These are consistent with many proposed actions within BC. BC is being confronted with a timber supply shortage. Are there lessons to be learned from NS?

Wood and Human Health Connection

UBC and FPInnovations has established a link between wood and human health https://tinyurl.com/y6wxe5us In the study the presence of visual wood surfaces in a room lowered sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activation. The SNS is responsible for physiological stress responses in humans. This result opens the door to a myriad of stress-related health benefits that the presence of wood may afford in the built environment. The application of wood to promote health indoors is a new tool for practitioners of evidence-based design.